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Can I Be Kicked Out of College Because of a Marijuana DWI?

Female driver holding a joint behind the wheel

College is an exciting period in life, but also full of pressure and challenges. It’s not uncommon for some college students to blow off stress by smoking or ingesting marijuana. However, if you smoke pot or ingest an edible before getting behind the wheel of a car, you’re in serious danger of getting arrested for DWI. Would you also be in danger of getting kicked out of school? It’s possible.

College Codes of Conduct

Most colleges and universities have a Code of Conduct that describes the rules students are expected to follow and details prohibited conduct. Codes of Conduct tend to focus on matters of academic integrity and honesty. But most also have rules regarding a student’s general comportment and may explicitly prohibit DWI or DUI.

Potential Sanctions for DWI

Student violations of the code could result in disciplinary action. The sanctions vary depending on the circumstances of the case and can range from light to severe. A student who has violated the college code with a DWI arrest or conviction may face any of the following sanctions:

  • Warning. A student may receive a written warning that they have violated the college code of conduct. This sanction is usually reserved for low-level code infractions or when there are mitigating circumstances.
  • Probation. When put on probation, the student is specifically warned to avoid any further code infractions for a specified period. If they commit another DWI or a different infraction, the school may impose additional or more severe sanctions.
  • Suspension. If suspended, the student will be unable to register for or attend classes during a specified period and may not be able to be on campus. After the suspension ends, the student may be placed on probation.
  • Expulsion. An expelled student will be permanently dismissed from school. They will not be allowed to take classes or remain on campus. Schools may resort to this sanction if the student has multiple DWI offenses, has caused bodily injury or property damage from the DWI, or has violated the code previously. However, it varies from school to school.

Defending Yourself

A student will almost always have an opportunity to plead their case before a disciplinary board before a sanction is imposed. However, going before a school disciplinary board is not the same as a court of law. The standard of proof is unlikely to be as stringent as in court. In fact, the arrest itself may be enough for the school to find you in violation of the code.

If you are a college student who has been arrested for DWI, you need a skilled lawyer to help you understand your rights and options and who will fight hard for the best possible outcome. Our experienced New Hampshire DWI defense attorneys can help. Contact Tenn And Tenn, P.A., to schedule your free initial consultation today.

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