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What Happens if You Have an Auto Accident But Only Have a Learner’s Permit?

New Hampshire is one of the few states that does not issue a learner’s permit. Instead, youth between 16 and 21 may apply for a “youth operators’ license,” which subjects them to specific regulations and conditions. However, even if a person with a youth operator’s license has an accident, they are subject to liability just like any other driver on the road. Here’s what you need to know.

New Hampshire Youth Operator’s Permit

In New Hampshire, teens are allowed to drive beginning at age 15 ½ as long as they are accompanied by a parent, guardian, or any other licensed adult over age 25. Under these circumstances, the adult will be responsible for any traffic violations the teen driver commits.

Starting from the age of 16, teens may obtain their youth operator’s license. If you are younger than 18 years old, you must have parental consent to obtain the license as well as have completed a driver’s education course, which includes 10 hours of behind-the-wheel training, class time, and 40 hours of supervised driving.

Because car accidents are the leading cause of death for youth between the ages of 15 and 20, and youth are prone to distracted driving, youth drivers in New Hampshire have graduated driving privileges. Drivers under 18 may not drive between 1 and 4 a.m. They also are prohibited from transporting more than one person under age 25 unless those persons are family members and there is a supervising adult over age 25 in the front seat. In addition, all passengers must have a seatbelt available to them.

If a teen under 18 violates these laws, they risk being fined up to $100 on their first offense and having their license suspended for up to 30 days. A subsequent violation may bring a maximum fine of $200 and a license suspension of 45 days. If they have a car accident and cause serious bodily harm to someone, their license will be suspended or revoked.

What to Do If You are a Youth Driver Involved in a Car Accident

As with any driver, youth drivers should stay at the scene of the accident and cooperate with the police and any other drivers. Other than identifying yourself, exchanging contact information, or calling for emergency responders, do not explain yourself or share how you think the accident occurred. You might accidentally say something that can be used against you. When you return home, your next step should be contacting an experienced New Hampshire personal injury lawyer.

New Hampshire Personal Injury Attorneys Serving Manchester, Derry, Nashua, and More

If you are a youth driver who has been involved or injured in a New Hampshire car accident, consult the knowledgeable attorneys at Tenn And Tenn, P.A. We are eager to defend and protect the rights of youth drivers throughout the state, from Concord to Bedford and beyond. Call 1-888-511-1010 for your free consultation today, or contact us online.

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