Top

How Political Differences can Destroy Marriages

The political divide in America has never been starker, and this division has taken its toll on marriages. With politics in the USA more polarized than ever, it is no longer rare for divorce lawyers to hear clients citing political differences for their breakup. Cross-party marriages are increasingly rare, and as the gap between parties has widened, things that just weren’t an issue for couples a few years ago now are.

Political divisions go further than just differences of opinion. Many fear their opposing political party would leave lasting harm on the United States. Political differences can account for the values couples want to instill in their children. Fiscal policy can also be a point of contention, with money being the number one reason couples fight.

Political Partisanship Can Be Toxic To a Marriage

However, the biggest threat to inter-political relationships is partisanship. Party loyalties are ever more tribal, and the political theatre more bitter. Across the West, social issues identify people with a culture, identity, and community. But as people group together in echo chambers, political discourse grows more aggressive and intolerant to differing views.

It can be difficult to accept that your partner sees the world differently from you. This is harder still if you are raising children together. It can also feel difficult if your partner’s political affiliation puts them at odds with your friends and neighbors.

What if Political Differences Lead to Divorce?

If these differences and arguments build to the point that you and your children would be happier with a separation, divorce might be in the cards. If your marriage is on the rocks, it would be wise to consult a lawyer sooner rather than later. Meeting with an attorney does not commit you to anything, but forewarned is forearmed, and consulting an attorney will see you better placed to protect the most important things in your life.

Political differences are not in themselves a ground for divorce. If you both live in New Hampshire, you have the option to petition for a no-fault divorce. To do this, you can cite “irreconcilable differences” as your grounds for divorce. Both parties will have to agree. If you argue that these irreconcilable differences have caused the irretrievable breakdown of the marriage, you do not have to assign fault in your legal documents. This can set you up for a far less acrimonious separation.

In some instances, you and your partner might be able to work out your differences. If you have already begun divorce proceedings but want to salvage your marriage, an attorney can help you. If you can show the judge that there is a reasonable chance you can rehabilitate your relationship, they will refer you to counseling. The judge can put the divorce on hold while you go through your marriage counseling. In some cases, patience and communication can bridge that gap between you.

Categories: 
Related Posts
  • Tips for Divorcing Your High School Sweetheart Read More
  • Is it Normal to Feel Numb During a Divorce? Read More
  • Four Documents You’ll Need to Update After a Divorce Read More
/
Why Choose Tenn And Tenn Let Our Family Help Your Family
  • A Family Firm

    We are a family committed to providing excellent service to our clients.

  • Statewide Service
    We work hard to obtain the best results possible for clients throughout New Hampshire.
  • Trial-Tested Attorneys
    Our lawyers are experienced courtroom advocates who are ready to take your case to trial to obtain justice.
Free Injury Consultations Available Contact Us Today

Whether you have questions or you’re ready to get started, our award-winning legal team is ready to help. Complete our form below or call us at (888) 332-5855.

  • Please enter your first name.
  • Please enter your last name.
  • Please enter your phone number.
    This isn't a valid phone number.
  • Please enter your email address.
    This isn't a valid email address.
  • Please make a selection.
  • Please enter a message.

Please do not include any confidential or sensitive information in a contact form, text message, or voicemail. The contact form sends information by non-encrypted email, which is not secure. Submitting a contact form, sending a text message, making a phone call, or leaving a voicemail does not create an attorney-client relationship.