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March, Also Known as the Month of Divorce

Many Americans, especially those with children, go through a yearly cycle of events. There is summer vacation, where families take trips together and enjoy the warm weather, followed by fall and the return to normalcy. And there is the collection of holidays at the end of the calendar year, followed by the return to work and the tiring days of winter in New Hampshire.

One way that these yearly cycles impact our lives is by influencing when married couples decide to divorce: According to the data, the month of March sees the most divorces.

Data Shows March is the Month of Divorce

In a paper published back in 2016, two researchers from the University of Washington – Julie Brines and Brian Serafini – went through divorce records from 37 of Washington’s 39 counties, and covered 2001 through 2015. While the researchers were originally looking for the impact of the Great Recession on the rate of divorces, they stumbled on a monthly trend in the number of divorces that was “very robust from year to year, and very robust across counties” that they covered.

While March proved to be the most common time to file for divorce, August came in a close second place. The months of October through January, on the other hand, saw a steep decline in the number of divorce filings in Washington, which was chosen for the study because divorce records were easier to obtain and search than in other states.

Post-Holiday Tensions Likely Behind March Spike

According to the researchers, the reason behind the significant spike in March was likely linked to the huge decline in the number of divorces during the winter holidays: Many couples try patching together a strained relationship for the holidays, putting off the decision to file for divorce until later. In other cases, the stress of the holiday season reveals a personality trait that strains the relationship to the breaking point and pushes the couple towards divorce. In either situation, close relationships are left weakened after New Year’s Eve, and couples are more likely to talk about the prospect of a divorce.

This explanation accounts for the steady increase in the number of divorces filed in January and February, culminating in the ultimate high water mark in March: Couples try making things work out for a month or two before making the final decision to separate, or they need time to find a divorce attorney and collect the necessary financial documents to begin the divorce process.

New Hampshire Divorce Attorneys at Tenn And Tenn, P.A.

The decision to separate from your spouse is a big one, and should not be made lightly or without all of the information you need to make an informed decision. If you need to talk about your options with a New Hampshire divorce attorney or are ready to take the step and are looking for the legal representation you need to see you through this troubled time in your life, contact the legal team at Tenn And Tenn, P.A.

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